FRAUD AND IDENTITY THEFT RESOURCES

E-FRAUD INTRODUCTION

» Thank you for taking the time to review some important information on e-fraud schemes that are out on the Internet. On this page you will find information on two relatively popular schemes called Pharming and Phishing.

PHARMING: WHAT IS THE THREAT?

» The Internet has proven to be a useful tool for accessing traditionally brick-and-mortar only businesses. This has led to innovations such as online banking and asset management. Unfortunately, schemes have been devised to direct a legitimate web address to a fraudulent web site, an act given the name "Pharming". Technically, pharming exploits a vulnerability in DNS server software the enables redirection of a web site's traffic to another web site.

PHARMING: WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?

Because pharming will look very close to the web site it is trying to copy, there are only a few things to look for:

» Uncharacteristic changes in the banks website

» After logon, the lack of the "S" on HTTPS in the "Address" text box and lack of a padlock at bottom of your browser which indicates a secure session

PHISHING: WHAT IS THE THREAT?

» Email is a very convenient form of communication, however, schemes have been devised to take advantage of this medium. A popular form of email fraud is called "Phishing". Phishing is the practice of luring unsuspecting Internet users to a fake Web site by using an authentic-looking email in an attempt to steal passwords, financial or personal information, or introduce a virus attack.

PHISHING: WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?

Typically phishing emails will have one or more of the following attributes:

» Address you in general terms such as "Dear Customer"

» Contain a non-specific subject such as "Peoples' Bank Notice"

» Mention that your account has had some type of unusual activity recently

» Require you to click on a link to another web site to correct the problem

» Require expedited action

WHAT CAN I DO TO PROTECT MYSELF?

» Educate yourself by visiting some of the links in the "Further Education Resources" section below

»Keep your anti-virus software up to date

» Ensure your computer system has a firewall properly installed

» Report suspicious-looking emails to us at (806)794-0044

» Review your account statements for accuracy and notify us if you see suspicious activity

» File a cyber-crime complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3). The IC3 is a Partnership between the FBI, National White Collar Crime Center and the Bureau of Justice Assistance to receive, develop and refer cyber crimes.

» Internet Crime Complaint Center

FURTHER EDUCATION RESOURCES

» FDIC Report on Phishing Scams

» Anti-Phishing Working Group

» FTC Website information on Security & ID Theft

» National Cyber Security Alliance

» Fighting Identity Theft